Jacob Antrican, Author at NFCR

Jacob Antrican

Donate and Earn Miles at the Same Time!

Fly to Find a Cure

Relax in comfort and style while flying high on Fly to Find a Cure miles with your favorite airline program.

American Airlines

Award Scale: a bonus of up to 10 miles per dollar for donations of $25 or more

Fair Market Value: $0.022575 per mile

Mileage Cap: 1 million miles per account per rolling year

United Airlines

Award Scale: a bonus of up to 10 miles per dollar for donations of $25 or more

Fair Market Value: $0.028 per mile

Mileage Cap: 250,000 miles per account per rolling year

Delta Airlines

Award Scale: a bonus of up to 10 miles per dollar for donations of $25 or more

Fair Market Value: $0.023650 per mile

Mileage Cap: 200,000 miles per account per calendar year

Alaska Airlines

Award Scale: a bonus of up to 10 miles per dollar for donations of $25 or more

Fair Market Value: $0.0275 per mile

Mileage Cap: 1,000,000 miles per account per calendar year

bettyphoto

Meet Betty Locke

“Donating to the National Foundation for Cancer Research’s Fly to Find a Cure program makes me feel like I’m helping people everywhere, including myself. It’s always wonderful to get the extra mileage to visit the places I want to go.” says Locke.

Get miles for your donation!

Key Advantages:

  • Gift supports cutting edge cancer research
  • Great way to keep your frequent flyer account active
  • Miles allocated to any account you choose, at no cost
  • Portion is tax-deductible

Thank you for your support. If you have any questions, please contact:

Melissa Gardner Whitemelissa
Donor Relations Officer
mwhite@nfcr.org
301-961-9133
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2016 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

Mary-Claire King, Ph.D. of University of Washington Awarded 2016 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

(Bethesda, MD – January 21, 2016) The National Foundation forCancer Research (NFCR) announced today that Mary-Claire King, Ph.D., University of Washington professor of medicine (medical genetics) and genome sciences has been awarded the 2016 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research. Dr. King’s pioneering research provided the first evidence of genetic predisposition to breast cancer.

NFCR’s selection committee was unanimous in its decision to recognize Dr. King, whose work has proved foundational to the genetic understanding of cancer. In particular, her proof of existence of BRCA1 and the identification of its location made genetic screening for breast and ovarian cancers possible. Mary-Claire King’s discoveries represent a fundamental step in the understanding of cancer and have changed the face of cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis and treatment.

“Dr. King is the true pioneer and world leader in the research that clearly demonstrated the genetic causes of breast and ovarian cancers by identifying the BRCA1 gene and its cancerrelated mutations,” said Dr. Fred Alt, Director, Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital, winner of the 2015 Szent-Györgyi Prize and Chair of this year’s Prize Selection Committee. “Dr. King’s work has opened a new field that allows scientists to investigate and understand breast and ovarian cancers and other types of genetic diseases with a much more effective approach.”

Dr. King’s discovery has led to the genotype-based breast cancer screening practice that can identify individuals who have inherited mutations in BRCA1 and give them a chance to take preventive measures at an early stage of their lives.

“I am honored and proud to be selected by the National Foundation for Cancer Research to receive this prestigious award,” said Dr. King. “The research on BRCA1 gene demonstrated that genetics plays a critical role in cancer. The benefits brought to women and their families by understanding the role of genetics in cancer has encouraged me to address ever more challenging genetic questions of complex diseases.”

“Dr. King’s work has saved the lives of many people who have higher risk of breast and ovarian cancers than the general population because of the inherited BRCA1 mutations in their bodies,” said Sujuan Ba, Ph.D., Co-chair of the 2016 Szent-Györgyi Prize Selection Committee and President of NFCR. “Thanks to Dr. King’s research, genetic screening methods are now available to identify people at high risk and preventive and therapeutic approaches have been developed to treat breast and ovarian cancer more effectively.

Dr. King will be honored at an award ceremony held May 2, 2016 at The National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Media and the public are invited and encouraged to attend.

 

About the Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research was established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research in honor of its co-founder, Albert Szent-Györgyi, M.D., Ph.D., recipient of the 1937 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine.

The 2016 Szent-Györgyi Prize Selection Committee was chaired by Fred Alt, Ph.D. and cochaired by Sujuan Ba, Ph.D. Other selection committee members included leaders in cancer research and drug development from academic institutes and biotech and pharmaceutical industries: Webster K. Cavenee, Ph.D., Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research; Sara A. Courtneidge, Ph.D., Oregon Health & Science University; Carlo M. Croce, M.D., The Ohio State University; Richard Gaynor, M.D., Eli Lilly; Susan B. Horwitz, Ph.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University; Raju Kucherlapati, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School; Alex Matter, M.D., Experimental Therapeutics Center & D3, A*STAR, Singapore; Philip Tsichlis, M.D., Tufts University School of Medicine; Peter K. Vogt, Ph.D., The Scripps Research Institute; Irving L. Weissman, M.D., Stanford University; Qimin Zhan, M.D., Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China; and General Secretary Yi Michael Wang, M.D., Ph.D., MBA, NFCR.

 

About Mary-Claire King, Ph.D.

Mary-Claire King, Ph.D., is American Cancer Society Research Professor of Genetics and Medicine (Medical Genetics) at the University of Washington in Seattle. In 1990, Mary-Claire King demonstrated that a single gene on chromosome 17q21 (which she named BRCA1) was responsible for breast and ovarian cancer in many families. Her discovery of BRCA1 and the approach she developed to identify this cancer gene has since proven valuable and revolutionized the study of numerous other inherited genetic diseases and conditions.

Dr. King’s current research employs the use of experimental and bioinformatics genomics tools to study complex genetic diseases in humans. Her research focuses on identifying and characterizing critical genes – and their interaction with environmental influences – that play a role in the development of conditions such as breast and ovarian cancer, schizophrenia, and hearing loss.

She has served on the National Commission on Breast Cancer of the President’s Cancer Panel, the advisory board of the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health, the Council of the NIH Fogarty Center, the advisory board of the National Action Plan for Breast Cancer, the NIH Breast Cancer Program Review Group, the Board of Scientific Counselors of NCI, the Board of Scientific Counselors of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the National Research Council committee to advise the Department of Defense on their Breast Cancer Research Program, and many NIH study sections. Abroad, she has served as Consultant to the Commission on the Disappearance of Persons of the Republic of Argentina and has carried out DNA identifications for the United Nations War Crimes Tribunal. Her lab continues to provide genetic identification services and currently serves as the DNA identification base for the United Nations War Crimes Tribunals.

Dr. King has won many awards and honors for her seminal contributions to genetics research, as well as her humanitarian efforts. She was elected to the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. King was honorary chair for the state of Washington at the 50th Anniversary of the United Nations. In 2012, she was elected president of the American Society of Human Genetics. In 2004, King was honored as the recipient of the Gruber Genetics Prize from the Peter and Patricia Gruber Foundation, and she has received many other awards throughout her career, including the 2014 Lasker~Koshland Award for Special Achievement in Medical Science and the 2015 National Medal of Science.

 

About the National Foundation for Cancer Research

The National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR) is a leading charity dedicated to funding cancer research and public education relating to cancer prevention, earlier diagnosis, better treatments and, ultimately, cures for cancer. NFCR promotes and facilitates collaboration among scientists to accelerate the pace of discovery from bench to bedside.

Since 1973, NFCR has provided more than $330 million in direct support of discoveryorientedcancer research focused on understanding how and why cells become cancerous, and on public education relating to cancer prevention, detection, and treatment. NFCR scientists are discovering cancer’s molecular mysteries and translating these discoveries into therapies that hold the hope for curing cancer. NFCR is about Research for a Cure—cures for all types of cancer. For more information, please visit www.NFCR.org.

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Cancer May Metastasize Without Lymph Node Involvement

Cancer May Metastasize Without Lymph Node Involvement

NFCR-funded research finds two distinct patterns of metastatic spread in human colorectal cancer

(Bethesda, MD, July 13, 2017) Research by several leading scientists including Rakesh Jain, PhD, Director of the Edwin L. Steele Laboratory for Tumor Biology at the Massachusetts General Hospital and supported in part by the National Foundation for Cancer Research, has provided the first evidence that the century old model for cancer metastasis – where cancer spreads from primary tumor, to nearby lymph nodes, and then to other organs – may not apply in all cases.

These findings were reported in the July 7 issue of Science and show that for the majority of colorectal cancer patients studied, distant metastases originated directly from the primary tumor without involving the lymph system in the process.

Using a simple assay developed by the same group, the scientists analyzed 213 tissue samples from 17 patients with colorectal cancer on their polyguanine (poly-G) repeats – small, mutation-prone segments of the genome – to determine the relationships between cancer cells at the primary tumor, lymph nodes and distant sites from the same patient.  Their results showed that in only 35% of the patients studied, the path of cancer metastasis fits the traditional primary tumor → lymph node → distant site model, as both lymph node and distant metastases originated from the same cell type in the primary tumor. However, in 65% of patients, scientists uncovered that lymph node metastases and distant metastases matched different cell types within the primary tumor, indicating independent origins for these metastasis types.

“Lymph node metastases are typically considered as a precursor of distant metastases. Yet complete surgical removal of lymph nodes does not always lead to extended patient survival. Our study provides the first direct genetic evidence towards resolving this enigma,” says Dr. Jain. “The poly-G typing assay we developed also provides a safe and cost-effective way to analyze the evolutionary path of cancer in individual patients, and could potentially be used in the clinic to help guide clinical management of patients with metastatic cancer.”

“NFCR is proud that our continued support of Dr. Jain since 1998 has contributed to numerous important research breakthroughs in his lab,” says Franklin C. Salisbury, Jr., Chief Executive Officer of NFCR.  “We are deeply encouraged by this significant finding and its potential clinical application towards improved, more personalized patient care.  This is another extraordinary example of Research for a Cure.”

About the National Foundation for Cancer Research

The National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR) is a leading cancer research charity dedicated to funding cancer research and public education relating to cancer prevention, earlier diagnosis, better treatments and, ultimately, a cure for cancer. NFCR promotes and facilitates collaboration among scientists to accelerate the pace of discovery from bench to bedside. NFCR is committed to Research for a Cure – cures for all types of cancer. For more information, visit http://www.nfcr.org/ or call (800) 321-CURE (2873).

Media Contact:
Hali Hartmann
443 474 6294
hhartmann@nfcr.org

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The Hope Fund for Sarcoma Research

About the Hope Fund

Deemed a “forgotten cancer” because of its rarity, sarcomas are cancers that start in bone, muscle, connective tissue, blood vessels or fat, and can be found anywhere in the body.  One particularly aggressive subtype of sarcoma is called malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST). Unfortunately, MPNST is only minimally sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation and patients often face a prognosis with a five-year overall survival range of just 30 – 50%.

The Hope Fund for Sarcoma Research is a designated fund established by Ken and Marianne Bouldin in honor of their daughter, Jennifer – a long-term survivor of MPNST – to raise awareness of sarcoma and support cutting-edge MPNST research.

“Our goal is not only to raise awareness of MPNST, but also to work with the international scientific community to develop an effective cure that would offer hope to other patients and their families.”
-Marianne Bouldin, co-founder, The Hope Fund for Sarcoma Research

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Corporate Partnerships

About Partnerships

NFCR offers companies the opportunity to make a difference in cancer research while getting valuable exposure for their brand. Whether you’re interested in sports, the arts, fashion or science, we have an event that will fit your sponsorship plans.

To learn more about our events and programs, please contact Director of Corporate Partnerships & Special Events, Brian Wachtel at bwachtel@nfcr.org or 301-961-9159.

The annual prize honors scientists who have made an original discovery or breakthrough in scientific understanding that has had a lasting impact on the cancer field and a direct impact of saving people’s lives. The award serves to highlight the essential role basic research plays in understanding cancer.

The Daffodils and Diamonds Luncheon was founded by Bethesda’s Alice-Anne Birch in honor of her mother and sister, both of whom succumbed to the disease. The luncheon is held to raise funds for National Foundation for Cancer Research, specifically for breast and ovarian cancers.

Play4TheCure is a fundraising platform for the National Foundation for Cancer Research which provides funding worldwide to the best scientists to enable cutting edge research that other large cancer organizations can’t and won’t fund. Play4TheCure inspires young athletes and their teams to leverage their passion for sports to “Play4” loved ones affected by cancer and encourages them to actively participate in working to fund cancer research to make a difference.

Arts4TheCure is the official fine arts and performing arts fundraising platform of the National Foundation for Cancer Research, It’s not just about one color ribbon, we’re for ALL CANCERS, ALL COLORS, ALL ARTS.

NFCR’s largest public awareness and charity event of the year is the annual golf tournament raising funds in support of cancer research.

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Build a Fundraising Team for Your Event

Our supporters’ creativity amazes us every day. Through many of our programs we offer the opportunity to create a community of supporters by promoting your own online fundraising page. Getting started is easy!

Play4TheCure

Play4TheCure is a fundraising platform for the National Foundation for Cancer Research which provides funding worldwide to the best scientists to enable cutting edge research that other large cancer organizations can’t and won’t fund. Play4TheCure inspires young athletes and their teams to leverage their passion for sports to “Play4” loved ones affected by cancer and encourages them to actively participate in working to fund cancer research to make a difference.

Inspired by Play4TheCure, Arts4TheCure is the official fine arts and performing arts fundraising platform of the National Foundation for Cancer Research, It’s not just about one color ribbon, we’re for ALL CANCERS, ALL COLORS, ALL ARTS.

Arts4TheCure

Rose Fund

The National Foundation for Cancer Research can establish a Rose Fund in the name of the person you would like to honor or remember. As well as honoring their life, it will also contribute to further advances in cancer research.

A Rose Fund can be established with any amount you would like to start a fund with. It also provides the flexibility to give whenever you would like there are no minimums or monthly requirements to donate to a fund.

Anybody can donate or raise money for the Rose Fund now and as far into the future as they wish. We make sure that all donors who choose to be kept informed know how much has been raised for the fund.

The National Foundation for Cancer Research allows people to establish a birthday celebration fund to allow participants to ask friends and family to donate to cancer research on their special instead of buying gifts.

Sign up and fill your personal fundraising page with stories, photos and updates.

Celebration Fund

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Gifts of Property

We accept cars and real estate assets as donations to cancer research. Put your unwanted property to use and make a difference.

Car Donation

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Have an old car taking up space in your driveway? Donate it to NFCR!

Real Estate Donation

real estate landing page

Donating appreciated real estate, such as a home, vacation property, undeveloped land, farmland, ranch or commercial property can make a great gift to the National Foundation for Cancer Research.

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Turn Your NFCR Donation Into A Dream Vacation

By Spencer Howard

Content courtesy of UpgradedPoints

At UpgradedPoints, we’re obsessed with maximizing the travel experience. There’s nothing quite like taking your dream vacation, whether that’s eating cheap Michelin star-rated food in Singapore or exploring European history.
Let’s be honest, though. While we all love to travel, we don’t really enjoy how much it costs sometimes. So, how do we make your travel dreams a reality? Frequent flyer miles.

Thanks to frequent flyer miles, you don’t have to take out a second mortgage just to take the vacation you deserve. Instead, you can focus on where to go rather than how you can afford to get there!

Earn Miles With Your NFCR Donation

Make a donation to the National Foundation for Cancer Research.

You might already earn extra miles when shopping online by using an airline shopping portal, but have you ever thought of earning miles for your charitable donations?!

When you make a donation to an organization like the National Foundation for Cancer Research, you know that it is helping push research forward to help millions of people in need of help. That, alone, more than makes the donation worth it.

However, The National Foundation for Cancer Research takes things a step further. They have partnered with several airline programs to give a little something back to you when you make a charitable donation.

For donations of $25 or more, you will earn 10 frequent flyer miles per dollar donated. NFCR has partnered with American Airlines AAdvantage®, Delta SkyMiles®, United Airlines MileagePlus® , and Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan™ so that you can choose which frequent flyer miles you would like to earn with your donation.

During April and May, NFCR will be offering 15 miles per dollar donated which makes this the perfect time to make your donation.

Now, earning miles is great, but just what exactly can you do with them? The best part of miles is using them for some amazing travel, so we wanted to share some of our favorite ways to use the miles you can earn from your donation to NFCR.

American Airlines AAdvantage

Japan Airlines offers a very nice first class experience and you can book it with American miles!

If you’re looking for a fun way to redeem your American miles, flying first class on their partner Japan Airlines to Tokyo is an amazing way to fly. For 80,000 American miles, you can enjoy your own private first class suite. Not a bad way to fly across the Pacific Ocean!

For 80,000 American miles, you can enjoy your own private first class suite. Not a bad way to fly across the Pacific Ocean!

Not only will you have access to a lie-flat bed on this flight, the crew on Japan Airlines are some of the best in the world. They go to great lengths to ensure you enjoy flying with them.

You can book this flight in business class, which also includes a lie-flat bed, for 60,000 American miles. This is only one of many amazing flights you can enjoy with miles.

If you’re curious about some other options, check out our top 24 ways to redeem American miles

Delta Air Lines SkyMiles


Use your SkyMiles to fly Virgin Atlantic Upper Class. – Image courtesy of virgin-atlantic.com.

Delta’s SkyMiles program provides one of the best ways to fly to Europe thanks to their partner Virgin Atlantic. For 70,000 SkyMiles you can fly to from the US to London in Virgin Atlantic’s upper class.

Flying Upper Class comes with several perks. You get a lie-flat seat, great food and drink (including champagne service), and lounge access at the airport.If you’re flying out of New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boston, or Washington, DC, you will have access to their famous Clubhouse lounges.

If you’re flying out of New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Boston, or Washington, DC, you will have access to their famous Clubhouse lounges.

If you’re looking for some other great Delta SkyMiles redemptions, we have 11 other fantastic options for you.

United Airlines MileagePlus

Take an amazing trip to the Caribbean thanks to United miles!

Have you ever felt like you needed some time on a beach to relax? Well, with United MileagePlus miles you can visit two Caribbean or two Central American destinations for 35,000 miles round-trip in economy class or 60,000 miles in business class.

Here’s an easy example of how United’s stopover (stays of more than 24 hours) on round-trip bookings can help you see two destinations: Fly to Panama City, spend several days relaxing (stopover), fly to El Salvador for a few more days before returning home.

You could also combine two Caribbean destinations such as Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic.

Want some more inspiration to help you use your miles? Take a look at our 16 best ways to use United MileagePlus miles.

Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan


Champagne is only the beginning of this amazing first class experience on Cathay Pacific.

While Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan is not as big as the airlines above, it provides one of our favorite redemptions. For 70,000 Alaska Mileage Plan miles, you can fly one-way to Asia in first class on Cathay Pacific, one of the world’s best airlines.

Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan even allows a stopover on one-way bookings, which means you can enjoy a stopover in Hong Kong before continuing to a city such as Singapore or Bangkok.

If you’re up for a real adventure, rather than connecting to another city in Asia, you can continue to South Africa for no extra miles. Now, that’s an amazing way to book an award ticket.

To get some other fun ideas, check out our 17 favorite ways to use Alaska miles.

What Are You Waiting For?!

The National Foundation for Cancer Research depends on contributions from people like you to support cutting edge research.

If that wasn’t enough, NFCR wants to help you take your next vacation by giving you tons of miles.

So, what are you waiting for? Pick the airline miles you want, make your donation, and start planning your next vacation!

* Please check airline websites for possible award changes.

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NFCR President Wins International Cooperation Award from the Chinese Medical Doctor Association

NFCR President receives the inaugural award from Society for Neuro-Oncology of the Chinese Medical Doctor Association for her outstanding contribution to international cooperation in March 2017.

From left to right: Wenbin, Li, Tao Jiang, Sujuan Ba, Webster Cavenee

 

Dr. Jiang Tao, the Chairman of the Society for Neuro-Oncology of the Chinese Medical Doctor Association and the vice director of the department of neurosurgery at Beijing Tiantan Hospital presented Dr. Ba with the award.

Dr. Wenbin, Li, the general secretary of the Chinese Medical Doctor Association and the director of glioma program at Beijing Shijitan Hospital, provided remarks at the event. He said, “Congratulations to NFCR President and COO Dr. Sujuan Ba for receiving the inaugural Award for Outstanding Contributions of International Cooperation from the Chinese Medical Doctor Association. Dr. Ba’s outstanding work has helped to build trust and alliances between the U. S. China, and other countries through diversified platform, ensuring that each country’s unique advantages are brought together to enable highly effective and productive international collaborations.”

The award recognizes Dr. Ba’s efforts leading and facilitating numerous high-impact international collaborative projects over the past two decades, including building a high-quality cancer tissue biorepository in Asia and a recent cross-continent adaptive clinical trial platform, GBM AGILE (which stands for Glioblastoma Multiforme, Adaptive Global Innovative Learning Environment).

Dr. Li also explained how “Dr. Ba has led the creation of the Tissue Bank Consortium in Asia and the Joint Tissue Bank Facility at Tianjin Cancer Hospital and Institute to promote best practices for biorepositories and biobanks and for building international collaboration platforms for tissue-based cancer research. The project has been proclaimed an exemplary international platform for private, public and government partnership for international collaboration in the fields of cancer biomarkers and therapeutic development.”

Dr. Ba currently serves on the executive committee for GBM AGILE and is co-chair of the Patient Focused Research and Advocacy Committee. GBM AGILE – a revolutionary clinical trial design – provides a learning environment that proactively generates new knowledge, identifies promising therapies and quickly moves them to advanced clinical trial phases.

Dr. Li finished his remarks by saying, “Dr. Ba has been instrumental in establishing, expanding and escalating the scale and scope of these and other highly influential international collaborative work. These projects have and will continue to make substantial impact in accelerating translational and clinical cancer research, bringing better prevention methods, improved diagnostic tools and more effective treatment strategies to cancer patients around the world.”

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A Simple Colonoscopy Could Save Your Life

This installment of the NFCR blog is by Liz Diamond, Major Gifts Officer with NFCR (she’s also the beguiling Brit that graces our voicemail!)

stop-colon-cancer

I have just had a colonoscopy and received a result that indicates I have no early signs of colon cancer.  This is my second excellent colonoscopy with a clean result and since I have no family history of colon cancer, I was advised to schedule another procedure in 10 years.

I am not a doctor and I don’t even play one on TV but my reason for telling you this is that I’m really hoping that you will consider having a colonoscopy too!  It could save your life.

If you are over 50 years of age, have a family history of colon cancer, are overweight or a smoker, schedule a visit to your general practitioner sooner rather than later to see when a colonoscopy is indicated for you.  (50 years old is the age that guidelines tell us to have our 1st colonoscopy for early detection.) Colon cancer is the development of cancer from the colon or the rectum, and it is due to the abnormal growth of cells that have the ability to invade or spread to other parts of the body.  I happen to live in Maryland and in my state, colon cancer is currently the second leading cause of cancer deaths.

COLON CANCER IS OFTEN TIMES PREVENTABLE!!!!!!  If, during a colonoscopy procedure performed under anesthesia by a gastroenterologist, polyps or pre-cancerous polyps are discovered in your colon, they will be removed during the procedure.  I am stressing the word PRE because if these polyps were left to grow unchecked, some of them have the potential to become cancerous.

Don’t take that risk!  Cancer is more treatable when it is diagnosed in early stages. If you are 50 or over, go ahead and schedule your colonoscopy.  If you are under 50 and have a family history of colon cancer or cancer polyps, or if you are African-American, then you may be advised to have colonoscopies starting at an earlier age than 50 and having them at shorter intervals than ten years.

In the immortal words of a certain ad – JUST DO IT! – make that appointment.   I am glad I did.  Even if my result had not been as favorable, my doctor and I would have taken further steps to prevent me from getting a colon cancer diagnosis.

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