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dark chocolate

The Bountiful Benefits of Beans

eat your beans feature

In honor of National Eat Your Beans Day, we’d like to boast about the bountiful benefits beans provide. Black beans… Great Northern beans… garbanzo beans… kidney beans… lima beans… no matter which you chose, beans provide a myriad of health benefits. In general, ½ cup of beans provides 7 grams of protein, the same amount as in 1 ounce of chicken, meat or fish. Beans are low in fat, filled with fiber and contain a powerhouse of micronutrients and antioxidants like copper, folate, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorous, potassium and zinc. In fact, research suggests that eating beans regularly may decrease the risk of diabetes, heart disease, reduce risk of colorectal, breast, and prostate cancers and help with weight management.

Data compiled from 41 countries revealed that countries with the greatest consumption of beans had the lowest mortality rates due to colon cancer.[i] In a Harvard study from the International Journal of Cancer, 90,638 cancer free women between 26 and 46 years old were monitored for eight years. Those who ate beans or lentils two or more times per week had a 34% lower risk of breast cancer than women who ate them one or fewer times per month.[ii] Additionally, data from 15 countries revealed that countries with the greatest consumption of beans had the lowest death rates due to prostate cancer.[iii]

Beans are an extremely versatile food and can be served in many ways— from soups and chilis to salads, veggie burgers and enchiladas to desserts like brownies, the possibilities are seemingly endless.  Try our favorite Cancer-Fighting Black Bean Brownies… but we must warn you, these brownies are seriously addicting and it’s impossible to eat just one. Try them and let us know what you think 

 

Cancer-Fighting Black Bean Brownies

(Recipe originally seen on CancerHawk)

 

INGREDIENTS:

4 oz. unsweetened chocolate (72% cocoa or higher)
1 cup unsalted butter or non-hydrogenated butter substitute
2 cups soft-cooked black beans, drained well
1 cup walnuts, chopped
1 Tbsp vanilla extract
¼ cup brewed coffee
¼ tsp sea salt
4 large eggs
1 ½ cups light agave nectar

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.  Line an 11” by 18” baking pan with parchment paper.  Spray with canola oil.
  2. Melt chocolate and butter in a glass bowl in the microwave for 1 ½ to 2 minutes. Stir with a spoon to melt the chocolate completely.
  3. Place the soft-cooked beans, ½ cup of walnuts, vanilla extract and a couple spoonfuls of melted chocolate mixture into the food processor. Blend for 2 minutes or until smooth. Batter should be thick and the beans smooth.  Set aside.
  4. In a large bowl, mix together the remaining ½ cup walnuts, remaining melted chocolate mixture, coffee and salt.  Mix well and set aside.
  5. In a separate bowl, with an electric mixer, beat the eggs until light & creamy- about 1 minute.
  6. Add the agave nectar & beat well.  Set aside.
  7. Add the bean/chocolate mixture to the coffee/chocolate mixture.  Stir until blended well.
  8. Add the egg mixture, reserving about 1/2 cup. Mix well & pour the batter into the prepared pan.
  9. Using an electric mixer, beat the remaining 1/2 cup egg mixture until light and fluffy.  Drizzle over the brownie batter.
  10. Use a wooden toothpick to pull the egg mixture through the batter, creating a marbled effect.
  11. Bake for 30-40 minutes, until the brownies are set. Let cool in the pan completely before cutting into squares.  These brownies are very rich, so cut them into small squares.  (Please note:  The brownies will be soft until they are refrigerated.)  Store in the refrigerator.

Makes 45 or so (2-inch brownies)

Sources:

[i] http://beaninstitute.com/beans-cancer/

[ii] http://www.shape.com/blogs/weight-loss-coach/5-cancer-fighting-foods-you-should-be-eating-today

[iii] http://beaninstitute.com/beans-cancer/

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Decadent, Delicious, Disease-Preventing Dark Chocolate

Valentine’s Day is a perfect time to celebrate your love with a food many love – chocolate. After all, chocolate tops most people’s favorite foods list, and it turns out there are some good health reasons in addition to the good taste reasons.  Chocolate – especially dark chocolate – is good for you.

Research shows that chocolate can reduce the risk of heart disease, lower cholesterol, prevent blood clots, improve memory and may even reduce the risk of cancer.[i] And, contrary to popular belief, research shows chocolate doesn’t ruin your complexion.

In the post below, don’t miss a unique chocolate truffle recipe!

dark chocolate barNot All Chocolates are Created Equal

While all chocolates contain antioxidants called flavonoids, dark chocolate and its main ingredient, cocoa, provide more health benefits than milk chocolate or white chocolate.
The stronger and darker the chocolate, the more flavonoids it contains and the more health benefits it provides.

For maximum health benefits when buying chocolate, look for:

  • Dark chocolate blocks with at least 70% cocoa solids.
  • Raw cacao or cocoa powder.
    One gram of cocoa contains over 30 mg of flavanols, whereas one gram of dark chocolate contains approximately 12.5 mg.To learn more about cocoa, read our blog post Cancer-Fighting Cocoa.
  • Cacao nibs, which are crushed, raw cacao beans. You can use these in place of chocolate chips in items like cookies, trail mixes or smoothies.

Cocoa & Skin Cancer Research

Helmut Sies, M.D., a biochemist at Heinrich-Heine-Universitat in Dusseldorf, Germany, is a leading cancer prevention expert and received funding from NFCR for his nutrition-focused cancer research. Dr. Sies’ key research breakthrough on micronutrients involves his discovery that lycopene – a carotenoid and antioxidant found in tomatoes – can help curb the initiation of cancer. His research has also shown that flavonoids (found in cocoa products) can prevent skin damage caused by ultraviolet radiation. High flavanol cocoa – which has similar amounts of flavanols as 100gm dark chocolate – improves skin health and hydration and may reduce risk of UV-induced skin damage.

Let’s be clear: This research doesn’t mean you should start rubbing cocoa products on your skin – but it does mean there could be skin-cancer fighting properties in some sweets!

Real Food Chocolate Truffles

The Chocolate Truffles recipe below provides a healthy twist on a classic Valentine’s Day favorite. They’re easy to make and your sweetheart will LOVE them!
Adapted from Diana Keuilian


chocolate balls
INGREDIENTS

  • 2 cups pecans, toasted
  • 1 cup dates, pitted and soaked in hot water for 10 minutes
  • ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon raw honey, melted
  • Melted dark chocolate
  • Unsweetened, shredded coconut flakes
  • Unsweetened cocoa powder
  • Minced dark chocolate pieces

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Place the pecans in a dry skillet over medium heat and toast, stirring often, until golden. Set aside to cool.
  2. Place the dates in a small bowl with hot water and cover for 10 minutes. Discard the soaking water and place the dates and cooled pecans in the food processor, along with the cocoa powder, sea salt and honey. Pulse until coarse and crumbly.
  3. Cover a tray that fits in your freezer with parchment paper. Form the dough into 30 balls and roll in the toppings of your choice.
  4. Place the truffles on the prepared pan and freeze for 15 minutes.
  5. Enjoy!

Fun Chocolate Facts

*Eating just ONE chocolate chip gives the average adult the needed energy to walk 150 feet.
*A dark chocolate bar has approximately 10-15g of sugar. A glass of orange juice has about 22g of sugar.
*Chocolate is harmful to dogs and can cause seizures and even death.
*Chocolate syrup was used to depict blood in the iconic shower scene of Hitchcock’s film “Psycho.”

http://www.2020site.org/fun-facts/Fun-Chocolate-Facts.html

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Cancer–Fighting Cocoa

Who doesn’t love chocolate? When it comes to a beloved treat, chocolate is a common favorite. But, unfortunately, there are consequences that aren’t that sweet!

Don’t get us wrong, we’re not trying to rain on your parade. The truth is there are pros and cons to the delectable delight. For example, dark chocolate contains powerful cancer-fighting antioxidants called flavanols, but also includes cocoa butter which has high levels of unhealthy saturated fat that can raise cholesterol levels and increase your risk of heart disease when consumed in excess.

Cocoa Can Help Fight Cancer

Dark chocolate and chocolate powderSo what could be a better option than dark chocolate?

When it comes to fighting cancer, the answer is simple: Cocoa!

One gram of cocoa contains over 30 mg of flavanols, whereas one gram of dark chocolate only contains approximately 12.5 mg. What’s more one ounce of dark chocolate typically contains about 170 calories, 12 grams of fat and 10 grams of sugar, while one ounce of unsweetened cocoa powder contains only 70 calories, 4 grams of fat and virtually no sugar.

Add Powdered Cocoa to Your Diet

oatmeal with cocoaBy adding powdered cocoa to your diet, you can reap its cancer-fighting benefits without the guilt.

It may taste bitter by itself, but you can simply add 2-4 Tablespoons in foods like oatmeal, smoothies or shakes to make a delicious addition to your healthy diet. You’ll find cocoa powder in the baking aisle at your local grocery store.

For more cancer-fighting food tips and recipes, visit http://nfcr.org/category/foodiefridays/

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