Bob Zhang, Author at NFCR - Page 8 of 10

Bob Zhang

Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer is one of the rarest types of cancer, accounting for about 1% of cancer cases for men. Although this type of cancer can occur in men at any age, it is the most common in men ages 15-35. In fact, it is the most common type of cancer for men in this age range.

Key Facts

  • An estimated 8,850 new cases of testicular cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2017, with more than 410 deaths expected to result from the diagnosis.
  • The lifetime risk for developing testicular cancer is about 1 in 263.
  • Thanks to early detection and advanced treatments, only approximately 1 in 5,000 men will die from testicular cancer.
  • Many men who develop testicular cancer have no risk factors at all. However, certain conditions such as undescended testicle(s), abnormal testicular development and a family history of testicular cancer may increase the odds of developing testicular cancer.

Testicular Cancer Research

In addition to specific projects listed below, genomics research is helping us attack testicular cancer – and all types of cancer. NFCR has distinguished itself from other organizations by emphasizing long-term, transformative research and working to move people toward cancer genomics.

Testicular
8850
new cases expected in 2017
1
in 263 lifetime risk
1
in 5,000 cases are fatal

Harold F. Dvorak, M.D., discovered that tumor cells secrete a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and this seminal discovery provided the molecular basis for the field of angiogenesis (meaning “blood vessel formation”). Angiogenesis makes it possible for tumors to grow and spread, and Dr. Dvorak’s discovery helped pave the way for research on anti-angiogenesis treatments that can halt and even reverse tumor growth.

In 2004, the first VEGF-targeting anti-angiogenic drug Avastin® was approved by the FDA for the treatment of colorectal cancer, and, today, in addition to colorectal cancer, Avastin is approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, the aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and certain types of cervical and ovarian cancers.

More than 280 clinical trials are currently investigating the use of Avastin in over 50 tumor types including a Phase II trial for patients with choriocarcinoma, a rare and aggressive type of testicular cancer.

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Thyroid Cancer

Thyroid cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the U.S. and makes up nearly 4% of all new cancer diagnoses. Fortunately, most thyroid cancers respond well to treatment, although a small percentage can be very aggressive and deadly.

Key Facts

  • An estimated 56,870 new cases of thyroid cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2017, with more than 2,010 deaths expected to result from the diagnosis.
  • The five-year survival rate for people with thyroid cancer is 98%.
  • In the U.S., thyroid cancer incidence has more than tripled in the past three decades. Much of this rise appears to be the result of the improved imaging techniques that can detect disease that might not otherwise have been found in the past.
  • Women are about three times as likely as men to develop thyroid cancer.
  • Although thyroid cancer occurs in all age groups, more than two-thirds of new cases occur in people between the ages of 20 and 65.
  • Many patients, especially in the early stages of thyroid cancer, do not experience symptoms. However, as the cancer develops, symptoms can include a lump or nodule in the front of the neck, hoarseness or difficulty speaking, swollen lymph nodes, difficulty swallowing or breathing, and pain in the throat or neck.

Thyroid Cancer Research

In addition to specific projects listed below, genomics research is helping us attack thyroid cancer – and all types of cancer. NFCR has distinguished itself from other organizations by emphasizing long-term, transformative research and working to move people toward cancer genomics.

Thyroid
56870
new cases expected in 2017
2010
deaths expected in 2017
98
% five-year survival rate

Dr. Paul Fisher’s laboratory focuses on understanding the molecular and biochemical basis of cancer development and progression, and utilizes this accrued knowledge to improve treatments for all types and stages of cancer, including the ultimate stage – metastasis.

Dr. Fisher and his team have developed the first sensitive and specific imaging agent for bone metastases, which are the greatest cause of fatalities in prostate and other cancers. The molecular imaging technique detects cells that express a gene called AEG-1 – which was originally discovered by Dr. Fisher. The gene has high levels of expression in many types of cancer including papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common type of thyroid cancer, with limited expression in normal tissues. Preclinical laboratory results demonstrated more accurate imaging of bone metastases than with any currently used imaging method and may lead to great improvements in clinical imaging for patients

Harold F. Dvorak, M.D., discovered that tumor cells secrete a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and this seminal discovery provided the molecular basis for the field of angiogenesis (meaning “blood vessel formation”). Angiogenesis makes it possible for tumors to grow and spread, and Dr. Dvorak’s discovery helped pave the way for research on anti-angiogenesis treatments that can halt and even reverse tumor growth.

In 2004, the first VEGF-targeting anti-angiogenic drug Avastin® was approved by the FDA for the treatment of colorectal cancer, and, today, in addition to colorectal cancer, Avastin is approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, the aggressive brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and certain types of cervical and ovarian cancers. More than 280 clinical trials are currently investigating the use of Avastin in over 50 tumor types. Two other anti-angiogenic drugs that target the receptors that bind to VEGF are currently in a Phase I/II trial and a Phase III trial to treat thyroid cancer.

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Uterine Cancer

Uterine cancer, also known as endometrial cancer, is the fourth most common cancer for women and the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic cancer in the United States.

Key Facts

  • An estimated 61,380 new cases of uterine cancer will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2017, with more than10,920 deaths expected to result from the diagnosis.
  • The incidence of uterine cancer is rising, mainly due to a rise in obesity, which is a key risk factor for this disease.
  • Affecting mainly post-menopausal women, the average age of women diagnosed with uterine cancer is 60 years old.
  • The overall five-year survival rate for uterine cancer is 82%.
  • Today, there are more than 600,000 uterine cancer survivors in the U.S.

Uterine Cancer Research

In addition to specific projects listed below, genomics research is helping us attack uterine cancer – and all types of cancer. NFCR has distinguished itself from other organizations by emphasizing long-term, transformative research and working to move people toward cancer genomics.

Uterine
61380
new cases expected in 2017
82
% five-year survival rate
600000
survivors in the U.S.

Dr. Wei Zhang has devoted his entire career to the pursuit of precision oncology – specifically to the key molecular and genomic events that drive the development and progression of cancer. Over the last 18 years, Dr. Zhang has identified multiple novel cancer markers and oncogenic signaling molecules.

When Dr. Zhang was working at MD Anderson, he and his team identified genetic mutations in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC), the most common form of uterine cancer. These mutations revealed a more lethal version of an EEC subtype that was previously thought to respond well to treatment. If oncologists can identify the patients with this mutation early on, they may be able to try more aggressive treatment approaches that would increase the likelihood for positive outcomes.

Dr. Kathryn Horwitz’s laboratory, that received NFCR funding for 30 years, focuses on the hormones estradiol and progesterone and their role in breast cancer. Dr. Horwitz’s research has shown that dormant or “sleeping” tumors can be “awakened” by hormones. Thus, her team is continuing their studies to better understand the significance of cell subtypes in luminal cancers, their role in initiating tumors and in spawning dormant mini-tumors at metastatic sites, and the roles of estradiol and progesterone in tumor arousal and recurrence. This work may also have a strong influence on the understanding and treatment of other hormone-related cancers, such as uterine and prostate cancer.

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West Hills College Softball 1st Annual Play4TheCure Breast Cancer Fundraiser

The West Hills College softball team held their First Annual Breast Cancer Game on Sunday and it was a big hit! The team came together to make a difference by helping to fund critical breast cancer research and raised over $1000.

West HIlls College Softball pink game

They sported pink shoes, socks, ribbons and special jerseys to promote the event.  They also went all out to make their field part of the tribute as well and lined the bases and pitcher’s circle with pink chalk! Play4TheCure is very excited to have such wonderful and passionate people join the cause to end cancer!

The roster includes: Alex Lovett, Felicia Remulla, Holly Stafford, Alyssa d’Artenay, Mackenzie Jones, Clarissa Caposino, Vanesa Morales, Ashley Brown, Valerie Romero, Chase Martinez, Hannah Martell, Kiesha Ramos, and Taityanna Santiago. Coaches include Staci Mosher, Gabrielle Brixey and Cady Brazelton. Special thanks to WHCC PTK and Sports Medicine Team.

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Play4TheCure Partners With NECLAX

US Lacrosse pilot program gives 11 youth lacrosse programs in Connecticut a special way to support cancer research.

(BETHESDA, MD – May 19, 2015) Play4theCure, the National Foundation for Cancer Research’s sports fundraising campaign, is teaming up with the New England Coastal Lacrosse (NECLAX) to raise funds for cancer research.

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2015 Annual Report

 

Below is a digital version of NFCR’s 2015 Annual Report.

You can now read about the cancer research accomplishments that year!

(Turn the pages by clicking the arrows on the top left corner.)

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2014 Annual Report

 

Below is a digital version of NFCR’s 2014 Annual Report.

You can now read about the cancer research accomplishments that year!

(Turn the pages by clicking the arrows on the top left corner.)


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2013 Annual Report

 

Below is a digital version of NFCR’s 2013 Annual Report.

You can now read about the cancer research accomplishments that year!

(Turn the pages by clicking the arrows on the top left corner.)


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2012 Annual Report

 

Below is a digital version of NFCR’s 2012 Annual Report.

You can now read about the cancer research accomplishments that year!

(Turn the pages by clicking the arrows on the top left corner.)


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2011 Annual Report

 

Below is a digital version of NFCR’s 2011 Annual Report.

You can now read about the cancer research accomplishments that year!

(Turn the pages by clicking the arrows on the top left corner.)


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